Rehydroxylation rhx dating

Thermogravimetric analysis complements the rehydroxylation research in understanding the influence of carbonates in the rehydroxylation rate.

The chronological limits are tested using excavated material from Iron Age, Jordan while known age brick samples are used to explore the influence of extreme temperatures on the rehydroxylation rate.

Since its introduction in 2009, application of the rehydroxylation (RHX) technique for dating fired-clay ceramics has been controversial, with very few satisfactory dating results collected in the interim. more Since its introduction in 2009, application of the rehydroxylation (RHX) technique for dating fired-clay ceramics has been controversial, with very few satisfactory dating results collected in the interim.

The stability and efficiency of this technique has been called into question by several investigators in the last few years, who have struggled to reproduce and validate this new dating method. 2000–7000 yrs old ceramic artifacts, the reproducibility in the RHX process rate is analyzed and discussed.

For further information, including about cookie settings, please read our Cookie Policy .Measuring temperatures of different depths in the field should be explored to counteract this limitation.The original (time)1/4 model needs to be further developed and the more complex amalgamation model should be focused on in future research.The technique relies upon the well-known characteristic of reheated porous ceramic vessels to regain water through a two-stage process (rehydration and RHX), where the kinetics of second stage has been shown to follow a (time)1/4 power law at temperatures of 13°–50°C.In this study, experiments were conducted in which the mass measurements taken from 19th-century ceramic artifacts could be described by the (time)1/n power law over a wide range of temperatures.

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